Autism

Can an Autism diagnosis be overcome?

Understanding Autism

“Autism” or “autistic” or “autism spectrum disorders (ASD)” are words to describe children who exhibit a wide variety of symptoms, including problems with communication and social interaction. Medical professionals and doctors sometimes give children with these problems a very negative outlook for health and success in life. They consider Autism to be incurable.

Autism is a label, not a diagnosis. A proper diagnosis describes where the problem exists in the brain, the degree of the problem and the extent of the problem in the brain. Children who exhibit the symptoms of Autism usually have problems in the cortical and midbrain areas of the brain.

Woman and little boy laughing

Recovering from Autism

A proper diagnosis describes where the injury exists in the brain, the degree of the injury to the brain, and the extent of the injury to the brain. To be successful one must treat the brain, where the injury actually exists. The Institutes offers a program of neurological organization that parents carry out at home. The program is carried out with the intention of encouraging brain growth and development in children diagnosed with Autism.

Parents may wish to bring their child to The Institutes. After a detailed history is taken and a careful and thorough evaluation is completed, a diagnosis is made and a home treatment program is designed for each child and carefully taught.

Myths & Facts About Autism

Myths

Myths About Autism
  • They have “behavior problems”.
  • They need to be medicated.
  • They are “mentally retarded.”

Facts

Our View on Autism

  • They have neurological problems.
  • Commonly prescribed medication alter brain function.
  • They are intelligent.

Autism Success Stories

Parents from around the world have helped their children diagnosed with Autism to move along the path to wellness. Using the programs developed by The Institutes, children diagnosed with Autism or “autism spectrum disorders (ASD)” have been able to improve function and, in many cases, perform at peer level-and above.

Siao – Age 23

Autism
Siao – Age 23
Autism

By three years of age, Siao had been diagnosed as autistic, his lack of speech persisted and he was socially withdrawn. Today, Siao, age 23, reads at the university level, and is a long distance runner.

Malcolm – Age 3

Autism, Developmental Delay
Malcolm – Age 3
Autism, Developmental Delay

“We have been doing the program now for 9 months, and he is a completely different boy. When he started the program, he said only three words. He now has 300-400 words, and more words are coming.“

Sean – Age 16

Autism
Sean – Age 16
Autism

Sean was diagnosed as autistic and as having a “non-verbal learning disorder.” When Sean was 11 years old, his parents first learned about the work of The Institutes.

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